Recommended Tools for Large Scale RC

WoodiE

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We've had a few threads over the years about what tools people recommend for Large Scale RC's, or asking for what tools they need to get started into the RC hobby. So instead of having all the information spread all over I thought it would make more sense to have one thread listing the most common tools uses on Large Scale RC's.

Recommended Large Scale RC Tools


  1. Hex drivers - The most you're going to get from any RC manufacture is usually only those cheap L hex wrenches. Try removing just one screw with one of those and you'll throwing it away quickly. Save yourself the hassle, TIME and your screws and get yourself a good hex wrench set.

    VIM-Tools-BHM100.jpg

    VIM Tools BHM100 - This is an amazing set which includes hex sizes: 2mm, 2.5mm, 3mm, 5mm, 6mm, 8mm in both straight and ball ends. It also includes two handles, one that doubles as a screw driver or T handle. The second is a T ratcheting handle. The VIM Tools hex kit also come with a nice case and a life time warranty!

    An alternative to the VIM Tools kit would be a hex tool set from DDM which offers a few less hex size bits (doesn't include 6 or 8mm) and doesn't include the ratcheting handle, but still a nice kit.

  2. Screw drivers - Many of you probably already have some screw drivers laying around somewhere, if you don't then get yourself a decent screw driver set as well.

    tekton-26757-screwdrivers.jpg

    Tekton 26757 Screwdrivers - Premium quality drivers that don't cost a fortune and covers all the sizes you'll need. Tekton also offers a life time warranty.

  3. Electric screw driver - When I was building my HPI Baja 5B SS kit I already had a nice hex driver and screw driver sets. None of that matter when I needed to dozens and dozens of screws. Building a Large Scale RC kit just simply wears you out. I ended up wearing out an old Craftsman electric screw driver building the kit, but man did it save me so much time.

    bosch-ps21-2a-driver.jpg

    Bosch PS21-2A - A 12v pocket driver that does a FAR better job than my burned up 4v Craftsman driver I once used. The Bosch is plenty powerful to build any RC kit and does equally as well for other projects around the house. The adjustable clutch is perfect for our Large Scale projects without having to worry about over tightening screws.

    An alternative would be the Milwaukee M12 driver. The Milwaukee is also a 12v driver with a little smaller battery and a little larger physical size, but still a great driver.

    Speaking of electric drivers, you'll want to pick up a set of 1/4" hex drivers and nut drivers while you're at it to use in your new electric driver.

    Here are a couple other hex bits that are worth considering to use with your pocket driver: Extra long hex driver set & this hex driver set.

  4. Socket Set - I'd also recommend either getting yourself a decent little socket set or you can buy the individual sockets you need, wrench, and maybe an extension or two. Most notably you'll want sockets for your wheel nuts (usually 24 / 25mm) and for your spark plugs.

    If you have the electric drive and nut drivers mentioned above, that will pretty much cover all of the needs.
Other Items

A couple other side items I would recommend having in your tool box that aren't necessarily "tools" per-say.

Blue thread lock, as you'll be using this anytime a screw goes into a metal piece to prevent the screw from backing out. I'm a HUGE HUGE fan of the Loctite blue sticks. You can get the small bottle version but with the sticks you don't have to worry about it leaking, dripping, running, or drying out. It goes exactly where you put it.

For differential and dog bone grease, I've had great results with the Transmission Grease by Team Fast Eddy. One bottle will last you many builds.

If you're just getting started and don't have a single tool laying around your house already, the above list would put you well on your way to performing most and build or re-build project.


What other tools do you use?

If you have other tools you'd recommend beyond what's listed above, please share them below.
 
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